Evolution
Fact sheet Title
  • The HMS Beagle began her second voyage around the world on December 27, 1831, from the port of Plymouth in southern England. (Her first voyage lasted from May 1826 to October 1830, while her third and last voyage was from 1837 to 1843.) The goal of the expedition was to gather hydrographical data from the southern hemisphere, along with other information about winds, marine currents, geography, plants, animals, and, of course, cultures from these as yet little-known regions.

  • From 1831 to 1836, a young Englishman named Charles Darwin (1809–1882) set sail aboard the hydrological vessel HMS Beagle on a voyage around the world.

  • Natural selection is the process by which traits (physical and/or behavioural) that increase a species’ chances of survival and reproduction become more frequent over the generations, transmitted through heredity from parents to young.

Origine
Fact sheet Title
  • Mysteries of the Earth’s formation
    Planets are born when stars form. Our planet, Earth, formed at the same time as the Sun. Before the Sun came into being, a huge cloud of gas and dust (the pre-solar nebula) occupied the area where the solar system would be born.

  • Among the many star-forming nebulae that have been identified to date, the Orion Nebula is the closest to Earth, at about 1,345 light-years away. On a dark winter night in areas spared the light pollution of big cities, it can be seen with the naked eye in the middle of the constellation of Orion.

  • This illustration shows what the early Solar System looked like. It shows the young Sun, surrounded by a disc of dust and gas that would eventually condense to form the rocky and gaseous planets.

  • Extremophiles come in many forms. For example, there are those that exist in the polar deepfreezes, those that survive in extremely dry conditions, those that thrive in highly acidic or saline environments, those that withstand to great pressure, and those that endure high levels of radiation.

  • The HMS Beagle began her second voyage around the world on December 27, 1831, from the port of Plymouth in southern England. (Her first voyage lasted from May 1826 to October 1830, while her third and last voyage was from 1837 to 1843.) The goal of the expedition was to gather hydrographical data from the southern hemisphere, along with other information about winds, marine currents, geography, plants, animals, and, of course, cultures from these as yet little-known regions.

  • From 1831 to 1836, a young Englishman named Charles Darwin (1809–1882) set sail aboard the hydrological vessel HMS Beagle on a voyage around the world.

  • One of the major scientific discoveries of the 20th century was made by Alfred Wegener (1880–1930), a meteorologist who began to formulate the theory of continental drift 100 years ago (starting in 1912). This theory posits that the earth’s crust is divided into plates, a little like the broken shell of an egg, and that these plates drift on masses of rock in the earth’s hot mantle that slowly move through convection.

  • Natural selection is the process by which traits (physical and/or behavioural) that increase a species’ chances of survival and reproduction become more frequent over the generations, transmitted through heredity from parents to young.

  • The earth’s history is marked by long periods of stability punctuated by sudden changes (on a geological scale) and often catastrophic events (for the ecosystems in place). This history is told by fossils, rocks, and indicators that tell us about past climatic conditions. This geological timeline is a good illustration of this history; it is divided into chapters.

biosphere
Fact sheet Title
  • Before talking about a subject as broad as biodiversity, it’s important to understand a few important words that appear frequently on this site. These words correspond to ideas, these ideas express realities, and these realities make up the world around us.

reference
Fact sheet Title
  • The earth’s history is marked by long periods of stability punctuated by sudden changes (on a geological scale) and often catastrophic events (for the ecosystems in place). This history is told by fossils, rocks, and indicators that tell us about past climatic conditions. This geological timeline is a good illustration of this history; it is divided into chapters.

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